Creative Thinking

Webcams Made Easy

We’ve been doing a lot of remote production during the pandemic and created this fun little video to help people setup up their webcams.

by Roy Cohn

We’ve been doing a lot of remote production during the pandemic and created this fun little video to help people setup up their webcams. Here are some additional tips to help you look and sound your best:

Choose a room with indirect, natural light. Sit with the window light in front of you and slightly to the side. If the sun is falling directly on you, use curtains to diffuse the light.

Don’t sit with a window behind you. If there is too much backlighting, your image will silhouette.

If using artificial light, avoid lighting that is directly overhead, which can create harsh shadows. Position lamps so that you have a consistent, even light falling on your face.

Choose a background that has some visual interest, such as a bookcase or artwork. Avoid sitting directly in front of a blank wall or in a cluttered workspace. To help create depth, it’s best to position yourself at least six feet from your background.

Pick a quiet, acoustically friendly location. This will typically be a room with soft surfaces, like carpeting or drapes. Avoid rooms with lots of glass, bare walls and hard surfaces, as this will create an echo.

Set the camera lens at your eye-level. Use a few books or a box to raise the camera if necessary.

Frame the shot to minimize the amount of “head room” when you position yourself in front of the camera. Head room is the amount of space separating the top of your head from the top of the frame.

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